About Renee Harding

http://www.tourdaufuskie.com

Posts by Renee Harding:

Daufuskie Peach

When Jan Crosby started experimenting with home-made soaps, she had no idea that she would eventually become the number one provider of bath and body products for Daufuskie Island. With an impressive variety of scents and products, “Daufuskie Peach” pleases the taste and style of anyone who comes through her door. Her soaps are made and sold in-house, which invites customers directly to her back porch.

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Oddly enough, the roots of Daufuskie Peach began with a dinner party. A handful of Jan’s friends attended John C. Campbell Folk School, where students can choose to learn about a variety of hand-made crafts (wood-turning, pottery, blacksmithing, spinning, etc). These friends came together for dinner and showed off what they learned during their attendance of the folk school, from French Bistro cooking to doll-making. “I came away from that dinner so inspired,” Jan explains, “I thought, ‘I want to do something crafty and creative too!’”. While checking out the folk school catalog, the category of soap making jumped off the page at her, and she was immediately hooked. Jan started doing research and became more interested with the more she learned. She started playing around with soap bases and essential oils to get a feel for the creative process. Eventually she realized her desire to make the soaps from scratch, which is a much more intensive process than using a soap base. “I experimented for a better part of a year on and off before I actually sold anything,” Jan says.

After about one year, Jan was convinced to showcase her soaps at a fundraising event for the Daufuskie Island Community Farm and Artisan Village. “I sold a fair amount considering I’ve never sold before,” she recalls, “People thought it was great, and I thought ‘I need to start a business!’” Daufuskie Peach was formed, and Jan had success initially by selling her soaps at the local farmers’ market.

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At first, Daufuskie Peach was based around 8-10 soap scents. “I then realized that I really needed products that compliment the soap,” she explains. She thought about what she, as a customer, would hope to find at a bath and body store. Jan knew right away that pump lotion was to be added to her list, and over time richer products such as body butters and scrubs entered the mix. Lotion sticks were later added for convenience sake. “I carry one with me always, in my purse,” Jan says, “It’s just so handy.” Her newest addition is a bath bomb, which hit the market last month.

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In addition to soaps, Daufuskie Peach offers lotion bars, pump lotion, body butter, and scrubs.

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Bath bombs are the newest addition

“I had to start [Daufuskie Peach] part time at first,” Jan explains. She had a full-time job and two children along with her soap-making. “You hit a crossroads sometimes where you have to make the decision – what’s it going to be?” Jan left the financially security of her full-time job in 2015 to commit completely to Daufuskie Peach. Would she change anything if she had the chance? “No regrets,” Jan says with a smile.

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the soaps offer a scent for everyone

Jan has over 30 scents including peppermint, honeysuckle, lavender, and a “camp fuskie” bug-off bar. Common curiosity wonders what Jan’s favorite scent is. Her top three:

  • Black Raspberry “The first time I smelled it out of the bottle… it was one of those ones that I immediately had to make.”
  • Islander “It’s the combo of the coconut lime with a little extra coconut in it… I knew it would sell great.”
  • Lemongrass “I love the exfoliation of the poppy seeds. It’s so fresh and citrusy but earthy at the same time.”

Even though Jan creates a number of additional bath and body products, the original is number one. “Soap is still my favorite.”

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Daufuskie Peach products make a great gift!

Jan draws inspiration from the island for her scents, and she is lucky enough to call Daufuskie her home. What does she love most about living on Daufuskie? 

“Something I realized very early on was that there is such a strong sense of community here… It’s such a great place to raise kids. You can really control the pace at which life hits these kids here. Because it’s such a slower pace, they grow up to be more conscientious and observant about the community, the environment and the people they are around.”

 

Check out Jan’s online store at www.daufuskiepeach.com!

Tour Daufuskie Explorers Membership

Are you looking for a great outdoor activity to offer your family?  Want some help entertaining your guests that come to visit Daufuskie?  Would you like to kayak or paddle board without dealing with the logistics of buying, storing, and maintaining the vessel?  Looking for a unique gift for your adventurous family?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then a Tour Daufuskie Membership could be right for you!

What is a Tour Daufuskie Membership?

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This all-inclusive one year membership is a great way to explore the island from multiple angles.  You’ll gain a number of guided golf cart tours, access to hours of kayaking and/or paddle boarding, free merchandise, and discounts on apparel.  Every level up offers more adventure, and you can upgrade at any time.  One membership is good for an entire family; you may divide up the tours and kayaking hours however you’d like!

Daufuskie residents, you will realize the benefit of having this membership ready-to-go when friends and family visit.  Instead of worrying about how to entertain your guests, send them off for a guided tour or a paddle on the water!  They’ll come back with a greater understanding and appreciation of this little island you call home, and you don’t have to worry about being their tour guide.  Leave that part to us!

Once you buy a membership, all that’s left to do is explore and have fun.  Pay now and leave your wallet at home for the rest of the year!

For more information on the Tour Daufuskie Explorer’s Membership, give us a call at (843)842-9449.

Daufuskie Island Conservancy

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The Daufuskie Island Conservancy, established in 2005, helps to protect what it is that makes this bridge-less island so special.  With the slogan “Love it, Save it, Share it”, the Conservancy’s goal is to protect & manage the natural resources of Daufuskie while educating the public about the island’s unique ecosystem.

The Conservancy hosts a series of public environmental talks, each discussing a different aspect of Daufuskie ecology.  Topics include sea turtles, gardening, alternative energy, and fishing.  This year, the Conservancy joined forces with the Daufuskie Island Historical Foundation to showcase “the year of the oyster”.  This is year-long series of educational talks, social gatherings, and field trips celebrating the importance of oystering on the island, past and present.

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The Conservancy’s “Adopt-a-Road” program was established in 2009 to tackle the issue of litter on Daufuskie.  Willing residents “adopt” roads on the island in a promise to keep them free of litter.  A monthy clean-up day is established, but most volunteers casually pick up trash as they see it day-to-day.  Many of the Adopt-a-Road volunteers are also involved in two beach sweeps annually.

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Daufuskie keeps its charming roads clean through the Adopt-a-Road program

One completed Conservancy project that is considered a large success by many is the implementation of a new recycling center for the private community of Haig Point.  First established in 2007, the intention was to reduce items going to landfill while educating Haig Point members about the benefits of recycling.  In 2011 this center got a major upgrade to a large single-stream recycling center including drop-offs for paint, e-waste, batteries, and more.

The downside to this project is that it serves only Haig Point; Daufuskie residents outside Haig Point gates are left without a recycling option.  For the environmentally-minded residents on Daufuskie, bringing recyclable materials to the dump is a frustrating and unethical experience.  The Conservancy has been working to create an all-island waste management facility which would include recycling.  Conservancy members developed a Solid Waste Integrative Services Study and presented it to Beaufort County in the hopes of establishing island-wide recycling, but have encountered roadblocks along the way from the county of Beaufort.

To learn more about the projects and programs that the Daufuskie Island Conservancy offers, visit their page.  In addition, the website has wonderfully detailed information regarding native plants and animals on the island.

 

 

 

 

 

“Daufuskie Blues”, the indigo artisans

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Leanne Coulter and Rhonda Davis have hit the Daufuskie artisan scene with their new endeavor, Daufuskie Blues. These ladies use organic indigo to create eye-catching dye patterns on scarves, cloths, and other fabrics. Indigo is culturally significant to this area of the South, and Daufuskie Blues is honored to be carrying on the tradition with this unique and tricky dye.

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a selection of Daufuskie Blues’ indigo-dyed fabrics

Before the synthetic age in the late 1800s, using the indigo flower was the only way to obtain blue dye.  Interestingly, the first successful cultivation of indigo in America was done by a 16-year-old girl named Eliza Lucas.  After her success, indigo quickly became one of the colonies’ largest exports.  Indigo was economically important because blue dyes were so rare, and it represented a status of wealth. Civilizations were shaped by their choice and ability to produce indigo dye, and South Carolina was no exception.

Rhonda and Leanne started Daufuskie Blues after taking an Organic Indigo Vat workshop together.  “We spent the next two years on our front porch. We’ve had an indigo vat going almost consistently ever since we took that class two years ago,” explains Leanne.

The “Blues girls” create an indigo vat by combining organic indigo powder with a fructose source, such as bananas, honey, henna, or any non-acidic fruit. Indigo itself is non-soluble in water, so you must break it down in the reduction vat. Leanne compares the vat to a kiln, in which you need to remove oxygen for the process to occur.

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the indigo vat

Once the dye is prepared, you can simply dip a material in the vat and pull it out. Interestingly, the color starts off as a light green. Only when it oxidizes with the air does it change to the indigo blue color. “It’s magical. It’s just so magical,” says Leanne. By adding folds, twists, or stitching, the Blues girls create a variety of interesting patterns of color in their fabric. Lately Rhonda has been experimenting with nautical shapes, such as turtles or starfish.

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When applied to fabric, the indigo dye is initially a light-green color.

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Rhonda Davis uses stitching to create nautical shapes

Why do the Blues girls love working with indigo? “Indigo is so different from any other natural dye,” says Rhonda, “…The culture, the history, the mystique surrounding it, the amazing way it physically works, and the process of maintaining the vat of dye”. Indigo vats must be given attention; it needs stirred daily and requires to be fed fructose to keep the dye active. “I mean, it’s like you’re caring for a little living thing, you know?”

Leanne is also drawn to the unique qualities of indigo and appreciates the complicated process it takes to create the dye. “Other dyes are so easy to use. You either cut the plant, get the root or whatever the dye material is, cook it up, strain it, and that’s your dye product.” Not so the case for indigo! The traditional way to extract the indica (dye property of the plant) is to place the indigo in a large vat of water, beat the indigo many times to allow the sediment to come out, drain the water, and repeat the process over again. “And that’s the process that was used in South Carolina,” adds Rhonda.

As Rhonda mentions, mystique and lure surround the indigo vat. Many believe that the vat must be kept “happy”, which means keeping it away from certain people. This includes pregnant or menstruating women, people who are depressed or suffering, unpredictable children, etc.

While indigo is the Blues girls’ staple dye, they have been expanding and experimenting with other natural dyes.  Can you guess what creates this natural pink dye that the ladies use?

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The answer might surprise you: it’s a bug!  Cochineal is an insect native to South America, Mexico, and Arizona.  The insect is crushed and dehydrated into a powder, which the Blues girls then use to create the dye.

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Daufuskie Blues is currently located in the historic Maryfield School.   Future plans including growing their own indigo to harvest their own dye, and providing education to visitors about the dye extraction process.  Stop by to learn more!

Grey Fox Squirrels on Daufuskie

If you have ever taken a tour around Daufuskie Island, chances are that you have seen a very peculiar animal scurrying about.  Appearing to be an over-sized squirrel with grey and black coloration, these curious creatures stop tourists in their tracks.  They are Grey Fox Squirrels, and have been prevalent on Daufuskie Island for hundreds of years.

Daufuskie Island Fox Squirrel

Daufuskie Island Grey Fox Squirrel

Why do the Grey Fox Squirrels look so different from the rest of the squirrel family?  Scientists have come up with an interesting hypothesis, and it all comes down to the relationship between the squirrels and a tree.  Fox Squirrels love to eat the seeds from cones of the Longleaf Pine tree, which used to be very prevalent on Daufuskie.  Longleaf pine cones produce some of the largest cones in the Southeastern United States (see below).  It is thought that their large body size was advantageous for the Fox Squirrel when trying to manipulate the pine cones to extract the seeds, and over time larger body sizes were selected for.  Their black-and-grey coloration may have something to do with Longleaf Pine as well.  This pine tree is extremely fire-resistant and flourishes in areas that experience fire.  In historic times on Daufuskie, leaf litter would build up on the ground and lighting strikes would cause fires.  The smokey colors of the Fox Squirrels may have helped camouflage them in a charred forest.  Whatever reason for their funky appearance, they are certainly a special species on our island!

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Longleaf Pine cone size compared to other species (Louisiana State University – Plant ID)

 

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A close relative to the Grey Fox Squirrel is the Eastern Grey Squirrel, pictured here

 

Daufuskie Island Black Fox Squirrel

Daufuskie Island Fox Squirrel

 

 

Interested in finding out more about wildlife on Daufuskie Island?  Join TD’s Naturalist in a “Wild Daufuskie” Eco tour!

The Iron Fish: new venue

written by Renee Harding

The Iron Fish Gallery & Studio has drawn national attention to Daufuskie Island with Chase Allen’s rustic coastal sculptures since opening in 2001.  This past summer The Iron Fish debuted its new gallery venue just a stone’s throw away from the original location.

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Starting in 2001, Chase Allen’s Gullah-constructed home created a unique and welcoming backdrop for his art gallery.  The gallery showcased sculpted fish, mermaids, stingrays, blue crabs, turtles, and more directly on his own front porch.

The Iron Fish original gallery venue...

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The Iron Fish gallery originally nestled on Allen’s front porch

This year Chase has officially outgrew the porch and moved his art next door.  The new venue won’t be difficult for visitors to find – it is still on his home property.  Completed in summer 2016, the current venue presents The Iron Fish artwork on a double-sided covered walkway.  With clearly marked parking spaces and an obvious entrance, visitors no longer will question if they’re trespassing.  The open space helps to showcase the variations in artistic theme work in a more polished light.

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The new gallery, debuted Summer 2016

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As always, you’ll likely find the artist himself hard at work in The Iron Fish studio, which is directly behind the gallery.  What else is new at The Iron Fish?  Chase has just finished up a 125-bird suspended installation at Palmetto Bluff Outfitters.  In addition, if you haven’t stopped by The Iron Fish recently to check out the new “Put a Light Behind Me!” collection, it is certainly worth the trip.  These back-lit pieces of artwork are coming soon to the Iron Fish website.

 

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Chase Allen welding Iron Fish artwork

 

Tour Daufuskie premiers Native Gullah Tour with Sallie Ann Robinson

 

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Sallie Ann Robinson, a sixth generation native of Daufuskie Island, is joining forces with Tour Daufuskie to debut the Sallie Ann Native Gullah Tour. This is the FIRST TIME EVER weekly-offered Gullah tour led by a native professional guide on Daufuskie.

Robinson is known as an authority of Gullah culture and cuisine, having been a featured favorite in programs such as QVC, The Food Network, and The Travel Channel. As a child, she was a student of the famous author Pat Conroy and is remembered in his critically-acclaimed novel “The Water is Wide”. Sallie Ann’s historical and cultural knowledge of Daufuskie Island is unparalleled, and her tour will unearth Gullah stories and give insight to growing up on this bridgeless island.

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Sallie Ann with Pat Conroy, author of Daufuskie-inspired novel “The Water is Wide”

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Robinson is the author of two Gullah cookbooks, “Gullah home cooking the Daufuskie Way” and “Cooking the Gullah Way, Morning, Noon, and Night”

 

The Sallie Ann Native Gullah Tour is offered four times a week; Tuesdays and Saturdays at 9am and 2pm. The debut tour is Saturday Nov 5 at 2pm. Tour duration is 2.5 hours and the cost is $55 per person. These intimate tours have limited spaces available and reservations are required. To book a tour call Tour Daufuskie at (843)842-9449 or email at tourdaufuskieguide@gmail.com.

Daufuskie Island Community Farm

written by Renee Harding

Pat Beichler started the Daufuskie Island Community Farm (DICF) 7 years ago on “a dream and a dollar”.  The farm now houses over 20 Nubian goats which provide delicious milk for the volunteers, some of which is made into yogurt and cheese.  A garden and an orchard grow organic fruits and veggies.  Every morning, eggs from free-ranging chickens are collected and taken home by community members.  Many other animals live at the farm, each with their own purpose and personality.  DICF is completely volunteer-ran, and locals may share in the bounty by purchasing a farm membership.

When the 9-acre land was leased in 2010, the farm volunteers certainly had their work cut out for them.  In order to convert the heavily forested landscape into farmable land, the entire area had to be clear-cut.  Operating under the principles of self-sustainability and local harvesting, the farm used an on-site saw mill to convert these trees into fences and buildings.

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The Goat Barn, the first building established on DICF

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“Poulet Chalet”, one of the three chicken houses

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The saw mill continues to be used on DICF

Anyone who has taken a stroll through DICF has probably enjoyed the company of some unlikely walking partners – the goats.  These free-ranging Nubian goats are surprisingly social; they’ll follow visitors around the farm waiting for a free handout.  On hotter afternoons, you will find them lounging in the dirt, kicking the occasional fly off.  Volunteers offer the goats organic food and a lot of love, and in return receive fresh goat’s milk every morning.

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Each goat has his or her distinct personality, and many of Daufuskie’s locals have formed bonds with them.  The baby goats are especially popular – in May and June of this year the farm welcomed 14 new goats into the world!  Visitors flocked to the farm to take a peek at the kids.  Goats can be “sponsored” by anyone in the community; the sponsor pays a quarterly fee for the goat’s food and gets to name the kid.

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the first two kids born this year, “Mo” and “Allie Lou”

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Baby goats will climb on just about anything, so be careful where you crouch!

The farm is also home to two Jersey cows; Bagel and Muffin.  They’ve been out of commission for a bit, but will be bred soon.  Farm volunteers are getting excited to have delicious cow milk again!

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Muffin

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Bagel

Ducks, chickens, geese, and guinea fowl also call the farm home.  The ducks and geese provide eggs and eat pesky insects that bother other farm animals (and volunteers!).  Guinea fowl especially love to eat ticks, so their contribution is much appreciated.

DICF's gaggle of geese

DICF’s gaggle of geese

Guinea fowl are a favorite for visitors

Guinea fowl

 

The garden at DICF houses a wide variety of vegetables and herbs such as collard greens, okra, peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, corn, rosemary, lavender, basil, sage, thyme, peppermint, and parsley.  Extra help in the garden is always welcome; fighting off weeds and cutting back bolting plants are ongoing battles.  Large blackberry and blueberry patches toward the back of the garden offer a delightful treat for passerbys.

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DICF’s garden-to-be (2010)

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today’s garden has over 20 beds, with more to come

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The farm’s orchard has come an impressively long way in one year.  Once an empty landscape, the orchard is now covered in trees that produce apples, plums, peaches, figs, and pomegranates.  Blueberry bushes are dotted throughout, and the ground is covered in edible plants such as squash, watermelons, and cantaloupes.  Keeping these plants sufficiently watered was one of the biggest issues for the orchard, so large swales were dug across to help establish a water table.  Planting a lush ground cover also helped retain water by diminishing evaporation.  Conservation of water is key on this farm!

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the orchard at its beginning

watermelon serves as part of the orchard's ground cover

Watermelon serves as part of the orchard’s ground cover

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Pomegranates are one of the many fruits produced in DICF’s orchard

 

The largest motivation for creating the Daufuskie Island Community Farm lies in the title itself: “community”.  Pat Beichler and other key players wanted to foster a sense of togetherness on Daufuskie Island, connecting folks toward a common goal.  It continues on that thread to this day, with volunteers from all over the island coming together to support the farm.  The main goal is simple: to provide the island with local organic food.  To reach that goal, the farm needs more help in the form of donations and volunteers.  If you are interested in volunteering at the Daufuskie Island Community Farm, contact Pat Beichler at (843)842-8999 or email at bowwow@hargray.com.  To donate, visit the farm’s website.

 

Daufuskie Island Guided Tour Options

Taking a guided tour with Tour Daufuskie is a great way to get a local’s perspective and insight into our rustic and quirky island.  Whether you are a history buff, a nature lover, or an outdoor enthusiast, we have a guided tour for you!

 

History and Artisans Tour

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The guided History & Artisans tour is a classic favorite!  If you’re looking for a great overview of the past and present of Daufuskie Island, this tour is the one.  While we can’t possibly cover everything in this 2.5 hour guided golf cart tour, we can tailor the tour to each group’s specific interests.  Common historic stops include the First Union African Baptist Church, Maryfield School (where famous author Pat Conroy taught and wrote a novel based off his experience), Billie Burn Historic Museum, Gullah Learning Center, and a number of original Gullah-constructed homes.  Evidence of Civil War, Native American, and Gullah history can be found throughout the island.  A handful of artisans practice their craft on Daufuskie, and this is your chance to visit their galleries.  Chase Allen at The Iron Fish creates unique coastal sculptures from rusted metal, while Lancy and Emily Burn spin Native American inspired pottery at Silver Dew Pottery.  “Daufuskie Blues” dyes fabric with blue indigo, creating eye-catching patterns and designs.  Jan Crosby offers her luxurious hand-crafted soaps with an island flare at Daufuskie Peach.  At “Wine and Woodworks”, Mike Loftus creates hand-carved wooden kayaks and canoes.  Not only will you get the chance to visit their galleries and view their work, but you’ll also learn more about each artisan from your local guide.  There’s no better way to get to know Daufuskie Island’s past and present!  $45/person, 2.5 hours

 

Sallie Ann Native Gullah Tour

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Sallie Ann Robinson is a 6th generation native on Daufuskie Island.  As the only native professional tour guide on the island, Sallie’s tours are highly sought-after and are available Tuesdays & Saturdays at 9am & 2pm.  In this 2.5 hour guided golf cart tour, Sallie will provide personal insight into what it was like to live on Daufuskie Island as a native Gullah.  One of her more notable experiences is that she was a student of Pat Conroy at the Maryfield School; she is remembered as “Ethyl” in his book The Water is Wide.  Sallie’s enthusiastic, humorous, storyteller style will leave you both entertained and informed about the history of Daufuskie Island and its people. $65/person

 

Kayak / Paddle-board Tour

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Tour Daufuskie’s Kayak & Paddle Board Tours are a hit among outdoor enthusiasts, athletes, and nature lovers alike!  Whether you want to cruise slowly and enjoy the scenery, or push yourself to exercise, these paddling tours are a great option for your group.  The tour can embark from two places, offering two different experiences.  For an ocean-front paddle, we start at the Kayak Shack near the Melrose-on-the-Beach Pool & Restaurant.  We may also leave from the County Dock, which offers more creeks and inlets to explore.  Either way, you’re in for a scenic and memorable ride.  $55/person, 1.5 hours

 

“Wild Daufuskie” Eco-Tour

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Daufuskie Island’s ecology is unique, to say the least.  Wood storks and egrets roost in trees above ponds inhabited by alligators.  Dolphins are a common sight on the shore, along with pelicans, osprey, and bald eagles.  Marine life is evidenced along the sandy beaches in the form of shells, turtle tracks & nests, and the occasional horseshoe crab.  In our “Wild Daufuskie” Eco-tour, you’ll have the chance to get an up-close look at some of these creatures.  You will also hear fun facts about these animals and conservation information from our naturalist guide.  Plant life can’t be forgotten – Daufuskie is known for its lush and untouched landscape.  Learn about both the flora and fauna in this exciting eco-tour! $35/person, $25/children under 12.  Kids under 5 are free!

 

Self-guided Golf Cart Rental

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Don’t forget – Tour Daufuskie also offers golf cart rentals!  If you are more interested in a self-guided adventure, this would be the choice for you.  A Tour Daufuskie representative will set you up with a detailed map and orientation, and then you’ll be sent off to explore the island on your own.  A 4-seater golf cart costs $75 for a 4-hour period.

Getting to Daufuskie Island by Water Taxi or Ferry

With the number of water taxi and ferry ride options to Daufuskie Island, it’s no wonder that visitors get overwhelmed with the logistics of their trip.  Tour Daufuskie is here to help you determine which ride best suits your group’s needs!  From a large ferry to a semi-private taxi, there is an option for everybody.

 

From Hilton Head or Old Town Bluffton

May River Excursions (843)304-2878

Offering the most scenic trip to the island, the May River Excursions water taxi is a joy ride to say the least.  They operate out of Old Town Bluffton, which is just a short drive from Hilton Head Island.  In this 25 minute boat ride, you will wind through rivers and creeks where shorebirds and dolphins are a common sight.  Your captain will drop you off at the Public Dock (also known as the “County Dock”), where the beloved Marshside Mama’s Cafe sits.  Make sure to set enough time aside to explore the historic Old Town Bluffton before or after your visit to Daufuskie!  With art galleries, a pottery shop, restaurants, and a farmers’ market on Thursdays, Old Town Bluffton is a great way to extend your daytrip.  Water taxi tickets are $45 round trip.  Call Tour Daufuskie at 843-842-9449 to reserve your water taxi to Daufuskie Island!

 

Daufuskie Island Ferry (843)940-7704

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The Melrose Landing on Daufuskie Island

The public ferry leaves from the Buckingham Landing and arrives on Daufuskie at the Melrose Landing.  They provide dollies for transporting luggage from your car to the dock, and friendly staff are always happy to help load up your bags onto the boat.  Keep in mind that you must arrive 30 minutes early!  For those folks craving some fresh air, a few seats are available outside on the back of the boat.  Alternatively, the ferry offers indoor air-conditioned seating with plenty of windows to get a great view of the waterway.  A round trip costs $35, and each way takes about 1 hour.  There are four scheduled arrivals and departures each day, with a later run offered on Friday nights.  They highly recommend reserving your seat after the purchase of your ticket; this is especially important during the summer and holiday weekends.  Good news – Tour Daufuskie can book your tickets with the ferry! Just give us a call at 843-842-9449 and we’ll set up your whole day.

 

From Savannah, Tybee Island, Wilmington Island

Bull River Marina (912)897-7300

Bull River Marina in Savannah, GA

Bull River’s water taxi costs $45 per person round trip or $225 total for a 6-person ride.  The water taxi to Daufuskie departs three times a day from Savannah and takes about 30 minutes.  They drop-off at a handful of docks on Daufuskie; County dock, Freeport Marina, Bloody Point, and Haig Point.  For those of you on Tybee Island who want to check out some quieter sands, Bull River also offers beach drop options.

 

Once you arrive on Daufuskie

If you are just visiting for the day, you are going to need a golf cart for transport around the island.  Your cart can be delivered to any of the public docks on the island.  Most of the sights on Daufuskie are located on sandy roads, so biking can be very difficult — carts are the way gain a full perspective of the island.

carts

If you’re staying overnight on Daufuskie and have luggage with you, you have one more piece to the puzzle.  Golf carts are not built to carry the weight of a group of people and their luggage, so you need to make arrangements to transport luggage to your rental.  Try Daufuskie Transit at (843) 338-2570 or email at DaufuskieTransit@gmail.com.  They will meet you at the dock, load up all of your luggage onto a trailer, and shuttle it to your rental home for only $20.  If any of your group will be traveling to the rental home with Daufuskie Transit, you will be charged $20 per person.

 

Figuring out the logistics of your trip doesn’t need to be stressful- just give yourself the time to plan ahead!  Trust us, when you arrive to the island you will be glad for it.

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