tour daufuskie

Daufuskie Island Ferry: dependable transport from Hilton Head to Daufuskie Island

If you’re looking for easy, affordable, and hands-free transport to Daufuskie Island, check out the Daufuskie Island Ferry!  The ferry is conveniently located at the Buckingham Landing (35 Fording Island Rd), in between Bluffton and Hilton Head Island.   Directions to the ferry can be found here.  The ferry is an affordable $35 per person round trip!

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the Buckingham Landing dock

At Buckingham Landing, you may park for free if you are visiting for the day, or pay $10/night for overnight visits.  The courteous ferry staff will meet you upon your arrival to help shuttle your cargo to the boat.  You pay no additional cost for your personal items such as suitcases, groceries, bicycles, etc.

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The ferry’s friendly crew greet visitors upon their arrival

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Don’t worry about your cargo – the staff will help get it safely stored on the boat.

The ferry offers rides to the island four times a day, with an extra run on Fridays.  The trip takes about 50 minutes.  Please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to departure!  For any questions or clarifications regarding the ferry, give the ferry staff a call at 843-247-5378.

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Good news – Tour Daufuskie and the Daufuskie Island Ferry have teamed up, offering you a simple streamlined booking process.  If you’d like to ride the ferry and do a golf cart rental or self-guided tour on the island, simply call Tour Daufuskie at 843-842-9449 and we’ll book everything for you!  Please note that ALL boat rides, tours, and rentals must be booked in advance to ensure your spot is reserved.

Visitor’s love renting a golf cart for $75 for 4-hours, $10 for one additional hour, and $5 for every hour after.  This self-guided golf cart tour comes with an orientation and map of the island.  If you want more local insight into the past and present of Daufuskie, take a guided History and Artisans Tour ($45 per person, 2.5 hours) or a “Wild Daufuskie” Eco-tour ($35 per person, 1.5 hours).  For the outdoor enthusiasts, the guided Kayak / Paddle Boarding Tour ($55 per person) is a great way to spend an hour-and-a-half on the water.  For a real treat, spend 2.5 hours with Sallie Ann Robinson in her Native Gullah Tour ($65 per person)

May River Excursions: water taxi from Old Town Bluffton to Daufuskie Island

Anyone who’s planned a trip to bridge-less Daufuskie Island knows how many boat options exist for transportation to and from the island.  It’s enough to make anybody’s head spin!

One of the quickest and most scenic routes to Daufuskie is through May River Excursions, located at 81 Calhoun Street in Old Town Bluffton.  The trip takes about 25 minutes and costs $45 per person round trip.

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May River Excursions leaves from the public dock in Old Town Bluffton.

After you check in with Molly in the May River shop, you’ll head down the historic road to Bluffton’s public dock.  There you’ll hop on the water taxi with one of their many experienced captains.  May River Excursions has a route unlike any other to Daufuskie.  You’ll wind through small creeks and inlets, feeling as though you’re taking a secret “back way” to the island.

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Wildlife viewing opportunities are abundant on this 25 minute boat ride

Along the way, you’re sure to spot some wildlife.  Dolphins, fish, herons, eagles, and ospreys are a common sight!  The dolphins are especially social, and if you’re ahead of schedule, your captain may slow down to give you a better viewing.

Once you’re done touring Daufuskie Island and head back to the mainland, you may want to spend some extra time exploring historic Old Town Bluffton.  This charming little town offers unique dining and shopping opportunities for your group.  If you’re lucky enough to be in the area on a Thursday, be sure to stop by the local farmer’s market, usually open 1pm-6pm.

Remember, May River offers more than just rides to Daufuskie!  If you’re looking for more adventure, try a fishing charter, crabbing charter, or dolphin excursion.  For more info, call May River at (843)304-2878.

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An Early Spring on Daufuskie Island

On Daufuskie Island, it is normal to see a layer of sandy dirt covering homes, buildings, and golf carts.  However, anyone who has visited the island over the last couple of weeks has probably noticed a new shade of dust that has taken over the island — the dust of yellow pollen.

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Yellow pollen currently decorates the majority of homes on Daufuskie Island

The Spring bloom came early this year to Daufuskie, about 20 days earlier than usual according to the U.S. Geological Survey.  The month of February saw an average temperature of 68 degrees Farenheit; 8 degrees warmer than February’s usual average.  There were seventeen days in February over 70 degrees on Daufuskie Island this year.

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The Azalea, one of the most popular flowerings shrubs in the southeast, usually blooms late March into April.  The Azaleas on Daufuskie Island this year, however, started blooming in late February!

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“Phenology” is the study of earth’s natural cycles, which includes seasons.  Spring is categorized by not only warmer temperatures but the return of migratory birds / insects and flowering of plants.  Daufuskie Island has certainly seen warmer temperatures and flowering plants, and many migratory birds have begun to resurface.

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Wood Storks, who migrate south for the winter months, have arrived back on Daufuskie Island.

While we enjoy the early warm temperatures and splashes of colors popping up, an early spring can be dangerous.  In previous years, the early onset of warm temperatures in February and March promoted early growth and flowering of spring species.  Temperatures then dropped in April, resulting in extensive loss in diversity in the southeast. The average last frost date on Daufuskie Island is April 1st-10th, so our frost-sensitive flowers could be in danger.  If these species die, they do not regrow for that year, which leaves crucial pollinators with little food.

False or early spring upsets the complex relationships within our ecosystem.  Some plants (such as many of the flowering plants on Daufuskie) respond to changes in temperature as their queue to flower.  Other species such as Beech and Oak trees use daylight as their signal that Spring has arrived.  Thus, these species will become out of sync if warm temperatures precede extended daylight time.  In addition, if a plant blooms a month early, hibernating animals which eat those plants may lose an important post-hibernation food once they become active.

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This map shows the early onset of spring in the south-eastern United States. This year, early spring is happening first in the Southeast, but it is advancing upwards and outwards.

Early spring is one of the biggest red flags of global climate change throughout the United States. Spring plant growth has been shifting earlier documented over the past couple of decades amid rising global temperatures. “Earlier spring onset may cause phenological mismatches between the availability of plant resources and dependent animals, and potentially lead to more false springs, when subsequent freezing temperatures damage new plant growth,” says a recent study in Environmental Research Letters.

For now, we bask in the March sunlight, enjoy the blooming flowers, and hope that no damage is done to our unique and flourishing ecosystem here on Daufuskie Island.

 

-Tour Daufuskie Naturalist

Grey Fox Squirrels on Daufuskie

If you have ever taken a tour around Daufuskie Island, chances are that you have seen a very peculiar animal scurrying about.  Appearing to be an over-sized squirrel with grey and black coloration, these curious creatures stop tourists in their tracks.  They are Grey Fox Squirrels, and have been prevalent on Daufuskie Island for hundreds of years.

Daufuskie Island Fox Squirrel

Daufuskie Island Grey Fox Squirrel

Why do the Grey Fox Squirrels look so different from the rest of the squirrel family?  Scientists have come up with an interesting hypothesis, and it all comes down to the relationship between the squirrels and a tree.  Fox Squirrels love to eat the seeds from cones of the Longleaf Pine tree, which used to be very prevalent on Daufuskie.  Longleaf pine cones produce some of the largest cones in the Southeastern United States (see below).  It is thought that their large body size was advantageous for the Fox Squirrel when trying to manipulate the pine cones to extract the seeds, and over time larger body sizes were selected for.  Their black-and-grey coloration may have something to do with Longleaf Pine as well.  This pine tree is extremely fire-resistant and flourishes in areas that experience fire.  In historic times on Daufuskie, leaf litter would build up on the ground and lighting strikes would cause fires.  The smokey colors of the Fox Squirrels may have helped camouflage them in a charred forest.  Whatever reason for their funky appearance, they are certainly a special species on our island!

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Longleaf Pine cone size compared to other species (Louisiana State University – Plant ID)

 

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A close relative to the Grey Fox Squirrel is the Eastern Grey Squirrel, pictured here

 

Daufuskie Island Black Fox Squirrel

Daufuskie Island Fox Squirrel

 

 

Interested in finding out more about wildlife on Daufuskie Island?  Join TD’s Naturalist in a “Wild Daufuskie” Eco tour!

Tour Daufuskie premiers Native Gullah Tour with Sallie Ann Robinson

 

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Sallie Ann Robinson, a sixth generation native of Daufuskie Island, is joining forces with Tour Daufuskie to debut the Sallie Ann Native Gullah Tour. This is the FIRST TIME EVER weekly-offered Gullah tour led by a native professional guide on Daufuskie.

Robinson is known as an authority of Gullah culture and cuisine, having been a featured favorite in programs such as QVC, The Food Network, and The Travel Channel. As a child, she was a student of the famous author Pat Conroy and is remembered in his critically-acclaimed novel “The Water is Wide”. Sallie Ann’s historical and cultural knowledge of Daufuskie Island is unparalleled, and her tour will unearth Gullah stories and give insight to growing up on this bridgeless island.

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Sallie Ann with Pat Conroy, author of Daufuskie-inspired novel “The Water is Wide”

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Robinson is the author of two Gullah cookbooks, “Gullah home cooking the Daufuskie Way” and “Cooking the Gullah Way, Morning, Noon, and Night”

 

The Sallie Ann Native Gullah Tour is offered four times a week; Tuesdays and Saturdays at 9am and 2pm. The debut tour is Saturday Nov 5 at 2pm. Tour duration is 2.5 hours and the cost is $65 per person. These intimate tours have limited spaces available and reservations are required. To book a tour call Tour Daufuskie at (843)842-9449 or email at tourdaufuskieguide@gmail.com.

Daufuskie Island Guided Tour Options

Taking a guided tour with Tour Daufuskie is a great way to get a local’s perspective and insight into our rustic and quirky island.  Whether you are a history buff, a nature lover, or an outdoor enthusiast, we have a guided tour for you!

 

History and Artisans Tour

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The guided History & Artisans tour is a classic favorite!  If you’re looking for a great overview of the past and present of Daufuskie Island, this tour is the one.  While we can’t possibly cover everything in this 2.5 hour guided golf cart tour, we can tailor the tour to each group’s specific interests.  Common historic stops include the First Union African Baptist Church, Maryfield School (where famous author Pat Conroy taught and wrote a novel based off his experience), Billie Burn Historic Museum, Gullah Learning Center, and a number of original Gullah-constructed homes.  Evidence of Civil War, Native American, and Gullah history can be found throughout the island.  A handful of artisans practice their craft on Daufuskie, and this is your chance to visit their galleries.  Chase Allen at The Iron Fish creates unique coastal sculptures from rusted metal, while Lancy and Emily Burn spin Native American inspired pottery at Silver Dew Pottery.  “Daufuskie Blues” dyes fabric with blue indigo, creating eye-catching patterns and designs.  Jan Crosby offers her luxurious hand-crafted soaps with an island flare at Daufuskie Peach.  At “Wine and Woodworks”, Mike Loftus creates hand-carved wooden kayaks and canoes.  Not only will you get the chance to visit their galleries and view their work, but you’ll also learn more about each artisan from your local guide.  There’s no better way to get to know Daufuskie Island’s past and present!  $45/person, 2.5 hours

 

Sallie Ann Native Gullah Tour

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Sallie Ann Robinson is a 6th generation native on Daufuskie Island.  As the only native professional tour guide on the island, Sallie’s tours are highly sought-after and are available Tuesdays & Saturdays at 9am & 2pm.  In this 2.5 hour guided golf cart tour, Sallie will provide personal insight into what it was like to live on Daufuskie Island as a native Gullah.  One of her more notable experiences is that she was a student of Pat Conroy at the Maryfield School; she is remembered as “Ethyl” in his book The Water is Wide.  Sallie’s enthusiastic, humorous, storyteller style will leave you both entertained and informed about the history of Daufuskie Island and its people. $65/person

 

Kayak / Paddle-board Tour

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Tour Daufuskie’s Kayak & Paddle Board Tours are a hit among outdoor enthusiasts, athletes, and nature lovers alike!  Whether you want to cruise slowly and enjoy the scenery, or push yourself to exercise, these paddling tours are a great option for your group.  The tour can embark from two places, offering two different experiences.  For an ocean-front paddle, we start at the Kayak Shack near the Melrose-on-the-Beach Pool & Restaurant.  We may also leave from the County Dock, which offers more creeks and inlets to explore.  Either way, you’re in for a scenic and memorable ride.  $55/person, 1.5 hours

 

“Wild Daufuskie” Eco-Tour

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Daufuskie Island’s ecology is unique, to say the least.  Wood storks and egrets roost in trees above ponds inhabited by alligators.  Dolphins are a common sight on the shore, along with pelicans, osprey, and bald eagles.  Marine life is evidenced along the sandy beaches in the form of shells, turtle tracks & nests, and the occasional horseshoe crab.  In our “Wild Daufuskie” Eco-tour, you’ll have the chance to get an up-close look at some of these creatures.  You will also hear fun facts about these animals and conservation information from our naturalist guide.  Plant life can’t be forgotten – Daufuskie is known for its lush and untouched landscape.  Learn about both the flora and fauna in this exciting eco-tour! $35/person, $25/children under 12.  Kids under 5 are free!

 

Self-guided Golf Cart Rental

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Don’t forget – Tour Daufuskie also offers golf cart rentals!  If you are more interested in a self-guided adventure, this would be the choice for you.  A Tour Daufuskie representative will set you up with a detailed map and orientation, and then you’ll be sent off to explore the island on your own.  A 4-seater golf cart costs $75 for a 4-hour period.

Getting to Daufuskie Island by Water Taxi or Ferry

With the number of water taxi and ferry ride options to Daufuskie Island, it’s no wonder that visitors get overwhelmed with the logistics of their trip.  Tour Daufuskie is here to help you determine which ride best suits your group’s needs!  From a large ferry to a semi-private taxi, there is an option for everybody.

 

From Hilton Head or Old Town Bluffton

May River Excursions (843)304-2878

Offering arguably the most scenic ride to the island, the May River Excursions water taxi is a joy ride to say the least.  They operate out of Old Town Bluffton, which is just a short drive from Hilton Head Island.  In this 25 minute boat ride, you will wind through rivers and creeks where shorebirds and dolphins are a common sight.  Your captain will drop you off at the Public Dock (also known as the “County Dock”), where the beloved Marshside Mama’s Cafe sits.  Make sure to set enough time aside to explore the historic Old Town Bluffton before or after your visit to Daufuskie!  With art galleries, a pottery shop, restaurants, and a farmers’ market on Thursdays, Old Town Bluffton is a great way to extend your daytrip.  Water taxi tickets are $45 round trip.

 

 

Daufuskie Island Ferry (843)940-7704

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The Melrose Landing on Daufuskie Island

The public ferry leaves from the Bluffton Oyster Factory and arrives on Daufuskie at the Melrose Landing.  They provide dollies for transporting luggage from your car to the dock, and friendly staff are always happy to help load up your bags onto the boat.  Keep in mind that you must arrive 30 minutes early!  For those folks craving some fresh air, a few seats are available outside on the back of the boat.  Alternatively, the ferry offers indoor air-conditioned seating with plenty of windows to get a great view of the waterway.  A round trip costs $35, and each way takes about 1 hour.  There are four scheduled arrivals and departures each day.  Departure times vary depending on the day, so check out the D.I.F. website for these details.  They highly recommend reserving your seat after the purchase of your ticket; this is especially important during the summer and holiday weekends.

 

Nautical Elite (844)200-4500

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Located at the lively Shelter Cove Marina on Hilton Head Island, Nautical Elite provides a top-of-the-line trip to Daufuskie.  Their “nautical limousine” has comfortable indoor seating in a climate-controlled cabin.  There is also outdoor seating available on the bow of the boat where you can chat with a knowledgeable first mate about the local area.  No matter what, you’re going to have a luxurious ride.  Round trip to Daufuskie is $79 and the ride takes about 1 hour one-way.  The captains are flexible in regards to your drop-off location, but the most popular is the County Dock where famous Marshside Mamas sits.

 

From Savannah, Tybee Island, Wilmington Island

Bull River Marina (912)897-7300

Bull River Marina in Savannah, GA

Bull River’s water taxi costs $45 per person round trip or $225 total for a 6-person ride.  The water taxi to Daufuskie departs three times a day from Savannah and takes about 30 minutes.  They drop-off at a handful of docks on Daufuskie; County dock, Freeport Marina, Bloody Point, and Haig Point.  For those of you on Tybee Island who want to check out some quieter sands, Bull River also offers beach drop options.

 

Once you arrive on Daufuskie

If you are just visiting for the day, you are going to need a golf cart for transport around the island.  Your cart can be delivered to any of the public docks on the island.  Most of the sights on Daufuskie are located on sandy roads, so biking can be very difficult — carts are the way gain a full perspective of the island.

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If you’re staying overnight on Daufuskie and have luggage with you, you have one more piece to the puzzle.  Golf carts are not built to carry the weight of a group of people and their luggage, so you need to make arrangements to transport luggage to your rental.  Try Daufuskie Transit at (843) 338-2570 or email at DaufuskieTransit@gmail.com.  They will meet you at the dock, load up all of your luggage onto a trailer, and shuttle it to your rental home for only $20.  If any of your group will be traveling to the rental home with Daufuskie Transit, you will be charged $20 per person.

 

Figuring out the logistics of your trip doesn’t need to be stressful- just give yourself the time to plan ahead!  Trust us, when you arrive to the island you will be glad for it.

The Daufuskie Wine and Woodworks Now Open!

Located on the north end of the island next to Freeport Marina, The Daufuskie Wine and Woodworks is owned and operated by Mike and Joanne Loftus. The couple spent 30 years in the northeast, but is now full time on Daufuskie Island! Mike and Joanne operate their businesses out of their beautifully designed post and beam barn, which can also be rented for private events and gatherings. The woodworking shop is concentrated on building wooden kayaks, surfboards, canoes, and paddleboards in the world. The quaint wine shop operates out of an attached building where they curate many wines and craft beers. With organic, sustainable, and low production wines from vineyards throughout the world, you will love every second of your time at Daufuskie Wine and Woodworks. The Daufuskie Wine and Woodworks is just one of many terrific stops on the Tour Daufuskie Guided History & Artisans Tour!

Daufuskie Island Wine and Woodworks

Daufuskie Island Wine and Woodworks

Daufuskie Island Wine and Woodworks Tools

Daufuskie Island Wine and Woodworks Tools

Daufuskie Island Wine and Woodworks Kayaks

Daufuskie Island Wine and Woodworks Kayaks

 

Palmetto Bluff Visits Chase Allen’s Daufuskie Island Iron Fish Gallery

Dylan Sell from Palmetto Bluff boated over to Daufuskie Island so he could cover a story on Chase Allen’s Iron Fish Gallery.  Below is Dylan’s story:

Chase Allen and Martha Stewart

Chase Allen and Martha Stewart

Chase Allen’s Iron Fish art gallery isn’t a place the average Lowcountry tourist happens upon by accident. Though a few visitors might wander down the dirt path tucked deep in the forest of Daufuskie Island and be drawn to the metal decorations on the walls of an old cottage, more and more are actively seeking out Allen and his seascape of fish and mermaids wrought from metal. The Iron Fish gallery has become a real destination and one of the most successful art galleries in the area.

Years before the Iron Fish art gallery existed, there was an unhappy business school student who happened to take a class in ceramics. Throwing pots inspired Allen: “I realized the pleasure of working with my hands.”

Through this happenstance ceramics class, the creative seed was planted, but before it could sprout, Allen had finished school and had gone to work as a real estate agent. It wasn’t long before he realized that selling property was not something he enjoyed. It was, however, what introduced him to Emily and Lancy Burn, owners of Silver Dew Pottery on Daufuskie Island. Remembering the joy he found in the pottery class and seeing that others were pursuing their art, Allen decided to take a huge risk. “I decided to live across from them. Life is too short to not do what you love. I quit my job and rented the place on Daufuskie with a friend.”

Some might say that moving to an island accessible only by boat to start a business might not be the wisest financial strategy, but Allen was determined. “I got a job as a waiter at Marshside Mama’s Cafe. I could bring in $150 a night, which was good money.”

After he had the income to cover his basic living expenses, Allen focused on making friends. He started meeting the other sculptors in the area and became friends with Jacob Preston, a gallery owner in Old Town Bluffton and potter renowned for his expert skill. Although ceramics was his first love, Allen didn’t want to move in across the street and compete with his friends Emily, Lancy and Jacob. So he found another medium in which to work: metal. He started welding iron scraps together into abstract sculptures, and later he began welding metal into fish, mermaids and other marine subjects that he is known for today.

When he decided to open his gallery, Allen looked for inspiration at the shops of artists he admired. He was impressed by the way his friend Jacob Preston operated his gallery. Sales are under the honor system; there are no salespeople, and visitors who wish to make a purchase simply leave their information on a sheet. So, following Preston’s model and advice from a friend, Allen put his art on his porch with a hand-written note telling visitors that they may take the art they like and leave their money in the “honor box.”

One day Emily and Lancy stopped by and bought one of his pieces. “It was the greatest vote of confidence they could have given me,” remarked Allen, and he started to believe that he could make it as artist.

Tools of an Artist
As Allen experimented and refined his craft, he began using blacksmithing tools to hammer and create indentations in his material. As his fish sculptures became more and more popular, his success created a problem. The fins of the fish sculptures required crimping to create regular ridges in the metal. Though the results might look similar to the simple crimped edge of a pie crust, crimping iron is physically demanding. It involves using a blacksmith hammer and a sheet metal crimper tool to achieve the desired effect. The sculptor must hammer the tool every few inches of the metal, which is a long, difficult process. “I thought I was going to develop a shoulder problem!” Allen explained.

For the sake of his throbbing shoulder, Allen realized that he needed to make his crimping process more efficient. He knew of an industrial crimping machine, but its cost was prohibitive. Recalling the old adage “Necessity is the mother of invention,” Allen, a creative problem-solver, solicited several friends to pool their money, knowledge, experience and tools in order to construct their own industrial iron-crimping machines. Each person contributed $1,000 to purchase the necessary supplies. These craftsmen, artists and industrial engineers gathered in an assembly line, and they built their own crimpers!

Years later, in his blacksmithing shop Allen has an odd-looking machine with a tire on top. This peculiar creation is actually the crimping machine that accelerated Allen’s production to an industrial level, thereby helping him become financially secure.

 Part of a Community

Besides having equipment challenges, as an artist living on Daufuskie Island, Allen needed a way to connect with other artists, his friends and his existing and potential patrons. Social media was the perfect solution. Allen started a Facebook page and posts regularly about his work. When someone sends a photo of one of Allen’s sculptures installed in their home, Allen posts it on Facebook. Facebook not only allows Allen to communicate with the people interested in his work, but it also gives Allen a great way to garner feedback and ideas from his fan base. For example, when one of his patrons made a suggestion to backlight some of the creations with LED lights, Allen took the suggestion, and the new lighted sculptures became very successful.

Allen strongly believes in giving back to the community. In 2014, 13 years after his daring leap out of office life, Chase Allen competed with over 1,000 artists for the American Made Award sponsored by Martha Stewart Living. With 55,000 votes, Allen won the Audience Choice award and its $10,000 prize. He donated the greater portion of his winnings to the Holmes Team, an organization dedicated to finding a cure for brain cancer. The organization is named for Holmes Desmelik, a six-year-old boy with an inoperable brain tumor; Holmes is the son of Allen’s high school friend. Allen donated the remainder of his winnings to the Alzheimer’s Association, Doctors Without Borders and the Spondylitis Association of America.

Despite his professional success, Allen has never turned his back on the people who supported his craft. Just last year, he wrote an article for his website urging Daufuskie visitors to check out Emily and Lancy Burn at Silver Dew Pottery, and to this day Allen speaks with immense respect of Jacob Preston’s pottery gallery to journalists.

After abandoning a career in the office to become an artist 14 years ago, Chase Allen not only turned his dreams into a reality, he used his success to bolster his local community.

Daufuskie Island Dining & Cuisine– be prepared for post-paddling hunger!

It’s 8 o’clock. You and your family just finished a sunset kayak tour on Daufuskie Island, and you’ve just heard the youngest whimper, “I’m hungry.”

Now you think this would be the time to panic but you thought ahead and got reservations, knowing that this secluded, 2.5-by-5-mile island only has four restaurants. Before you got to this point, the real panic was not, “Are we going to eat?”, but instead, “What should we eat?”

Your family, friends, and TripAdvisor, probably had rave reviews about each place separately, so you went ahead and researched them all, starting with Marshside Mama’s at the county dock. Voted one of Travel and Leisure’s top beach bars, this so-called “dive” is quintessential Daufuskie island. Boaters can pull up directly to the dock for the famously fresh menu, or to see live music on weekends. The menu, created by owner Beth Shipman, is written daily on a whiteboard– a sign of how truly fresh each dish is.  There are a few favorites which can always be found on the menu, such as gumbo or voodoo pasta. The fresh catch is brought to the dock daily directly from the fishermen who caught it. Reservations are mandatory, and always remember: No whining, just dance!

The next place you thought to look up was the Old Daufuskie Crab Company at Freeport Marina. This restaurant, right on the water just like Marshside Mama’s, has one of the best sunset views around. This restaurant has everything from shrimp to steak to an extensive kids’ menu, and is described as “down home good eatin'”…with an island twist that only Daufuskie can offer.

Next is the Eagle’s Nest restaurant at Bloody Point, which serves lunch and dinner every day from 11am to 8 pm, with happy hour fro 4-6 pm. The Eagle’s Nest brings a self described “flip-flop luxury” to Daufuskie Island. The menu ranges from simple sandwiches to gourmet entrees, all served in a member-guest clubhouse atmosphere. Everyone is welcome at this family owned and operated restaurant; however, reservations are encouraged. And don’t forget to visit them for their weekly Sunday brunch menu– the Fuskie French Toast is to die for!

The Eagle’s Nest Restaurant at Bloody Point

The fourth and final restaurant you found during your research is the newly renovated Melrose on the Beach restaurant. Open 11am to 9 pm daily, this is the perfect place to dine “post-paddle”.  From all-you-can-eat specials every Wednesday to weekly oyster roasts and lowcountry boil on Fridays, the Beach Club at Melrose has events every week that the whole family can enjoy.  The gourmet entrees offered after 5pm daily are some of the best in the lowcountry, and even items on the kids’ menu are incredible. While you’re there, of course, you can pick up Tour Daufuskie shirts for the whole family at Tour Daufuskie’s “kayak shack” located between the pool and the ocean…naturally.

Melrose On The Beach Tour Daufuskie Daufuskie Islan

Melrose on the Beach restaurant

With no grocery store, one would think Daufuskie Island’s four restaurants might have a big problem coming up with a menu. However, that’s not the case in the slightest, and the fact that there is not a grocery store leaves no questions about one thing: everything here is fresh. So there’s no doubt that the perfect way to follow an evening paddle trip is by filling up with some delicious lowcountry cuisine found right here on Daufuskie!

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